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Abstract:   (29 Views)
Background: Depression impairs cognitive brain functions and memory processing. On the other hand, escitalopram (as an antidepressant drug) and exercise (as a life style) affect brain functions in depression. Therefore, this study investigated the comparative therapeutic effects of exercise, different dose of escitalopram and escitalopram-accompanied exercise on different aspects of cognitive functions in rats under depression.
Materials and Methods: Male rats were randomly allocated to different groups as following Control, Sham, Depression, Depression-Rest, Depression-Exercise, Depression-Escitalopram 10mg/kg, Depression-Escitalopram 20­mg/kg, Depression-Escitalopram10-Exercise, Depression-Escitalopram20-Exercise. For inducing of depression, chronic restraint stress (6h/day/14 days) was used. In addition, both injection of escitalopram and running on treadmill (1 h/day) were performed for 14­ days after stress-induced depression. Passive avoidance test was used for evaluating of different aspect of brain functions.
Results: results showed that the learning and memory decreased by depression. Whereas, exercise alone and exercise‑accompanied escitalopram 20 significantly improved them. There was significant enhancement of memory in administration of escitalopram­20 alone than escitalopram10 in depressive rats. In addition, there was a significant improvement on memory consolidation in the exercise and escitalopram20-accompanied exercise. However, the locomotor activity decreased according in these both groups.
Conclusion: The data indicated that depression severity destructed brain functions. It was found that escitalopram­20 alone had a better effect than escitalopram10 on improvement of memory deficit in depressive subjects. Furthermore, exercise improved memory better than escitalopram in depression. Finally, the synergistic effect of exercise and escitalopram20 improved memory deficit as the best treatment protocol. 
     
Types of Manuscript: Original Research | Subject: Learning and memory