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Abstract:   (119 Views)
Background: We investigated the subchronic toxicity concerns of a polyherbal formulation (PHF; Dr Iguedo Goko Cleanser®) on haematological indices, brain and spleen histomorphology in exposed Wistar rats of both sexes. Methods: Thirty Wistar rats randomly allotted to six groups (5/group) were experimentally exposed to PHF via the oral route for 60 days as follows: control groups (1 and 4; given 5 mL/kg distilled water); groups 2, 5 (476.24 mg/kg) and 3, 6 (158.75 mg/kg) body weight PHF, respectively. On 62nd day, animals were euthanized using carbon dioxide and sacrificed; spleen and brain tissues were eviscerated, weighed and fixed in 10% buffered-formalin for histopathological assessment. Data generated were analysed using one-way ANOVA, followed by LSD as a post hoc test. Results: Showed significant (p<0.05) increase in platelet in all experimental rats relative to control. Low dosed (158.75 mg/kg) male rats recorded a significant increase in WBC relative to control. Also increased were MCV and MCH in male rats. High dosed female rats had increased RBC and MCV. Neutrophils and lymphocyte differentials were respectively decreased and increased in experimental groups relative to control. Histopathology of the spleen and brain tissues revealed degrees of pathologies like abnormal cytostructure of lymphoid follicle, degenerated T-lymphocytes, numerous organic deposits, degenerating neural cells, proliferating astrocytes, widely scattered blood vessel amongst others. Conclusion: Our findings revealed exposure-associated toxic effects of the quasi-drug formulation on blood parameters and histostructure of the spleen and brain. Findings suggest utmost caution on long-term use of the polyherbal formulation and avoidance whenever possible.
 
     
Types of Manuscript: Experimental research article | Subject: Toxicology

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